Presenting

Presenting ideas for industry research

Current issues, Examples of practice, Experience, Industry and experience, Portfolios, Project partners, School of Fashion and Textiles, Social learning, Strategic alignment, Student as producer, Workplace based learning 2 Comments

Tony Cooper has asked for a range of ideas and ways for people to communicate their Trend Report Folio assignment, undertaken in the Fashion and Textiles Industry Research course.

A photo of Lyndon Johnson and Robert McNamara looking perplexed

Moods: President Lyndon B. Johnson, Secretary of Defence Robert McNamara in Cabinet Room meeting in 1968

 

Your audience will be fatigued

Put yourselves in their shoes, they have to look at a bunch of these in the same compressed time-frame. They’ve been doing this for years now. They are looking to quickly categorise and rate your work to criteria. They want to be impressed, and they want you to be impressive.

A comic strip in Persian, depicting the Anglo/Soviet invasion of Iran

Page from The Regained Glory, a book about Mohammad Reza Pahlavi – this page is about Anglo-Soviet invasion of Iran. By Universal Publishing on Wikimedia Commons. Consider sequential art theories in any presentation. A good place to start is Scott McCLoud’s Understanding Comics (1993).

Extending slide presentations

You can show a slide presentation to a room full of people, but what if the person who needed to see it wasn’t there? Does your presentation communicate your message without you?

  1. Google Slides is good for groups working together from sketching to finished form
  2. Image stacks presented through album services like Flickr or Google Photo Albums
  3. Print on Demand services are connected to photo album services, or you can load your own files (such as a PDF exported from Google slides, to services like Lulu.com

Using data

A network graph showing A partial map of the Internet

A partial map of the Internet by the Opte Project on Wikimedia Commons

Sometimes an idea can be brought to its simplest and most compelling form when framed by numbers, graphs, pie charts and infographics.

  1. You can get pretty sophisticated fashion data from services like Edited
  2. Or you can source your own by combining sources like Google Trends, Google Books Ngram Viewer, Google shopping insights
  3. Going further takes you into various social media analytics services, and social network analysis more broadly

Using video

A good slide presentation runs at about 1 frame per minute. A video runs at 25 frames a second. A good video can say a lot more than you can in 1 minute.

I don’t suggest you hold your phone like this, or even attempt to record audio in a crowded outdoor market. The brick column might have been a good surface to mount the camera, with some double sided sticky velcro perhaps. Or a selfy stick leaning against it.

  1. Some phone cameras shoot in high definition. With the right lighting, audio level and a stable mounting surface for the phone, good video can be recorded.
  2. Google’s Hangouts on Air will record video to your Youtube channel. You could use it to record interviews with people, presentations of your screen, panel discussions and even your oral presentation itself.
  3. Having a Youtube channel you can source other video and add them to playlists, edit your own videos, and distribute your presentations as video. Youtube supports emerging formats like 360/Spherical.

 

Featured image by Steve Baty

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Comments 2

  1. Liaison with industry through this WIL project tells us that students embarking on their fashion merchandising careers require a level of cognitive self-sufficiency and a strong suite of digital skills to take advantage of newly emerging employment opportunities. We are working with Leigh and the DSC Digital Team to enhance student’s skills and abilities by incorporating ‘blue sky’ thinking and an exposure to the burgeoning suite of digital platforms into several assessment takes in this second year course. The trial will be evaluated against a set of metrics at the completion of the semester to identify refinement opportunities and determine a broader roll out.

    Tony Cooper
    RMIT University
    Fashion & Textiles

    1. Thanks Tony, this is helpful context for people too. In a meeting after the presentation, we discussed benchmarks for evaluating the outcomes of this development too. We have the examples of student work from last year; we have the same teachers and mentors involved from last year; we have mostly the same industry partners too.. so comparing the works and interviewing the teachers and industry partners ought to give us a good idea of the outcomes here. It’s exciting project to be a part of – thanks for involving me.

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